MEAP pep assembly

marching band

In preparation for our state standardized testing, we held a number of activities.  Our students built floats (on wagons or carts), created banners and attended a pep assembly for the M.E.A.P.

Each class was responsible for creating a float or banner to display at the assembly, similar to Homecoming.  Floats and banners were paraded to the cafeteria to be judged.  A winner was decided for each grade.

Then the fun began:

The student body was dismissed to the gym, where the float parade would take place.  First, the MEAP King was crowned: a teacher had been selected to act as MEAP King.  Each float or banner was then paraded past the bleachers, with an announcer calling out their teacher’s name, grade, students who were escorting the float and the name of the float.  After the floats and banners were all in the gym, the big surprise: the high school marching band marched in and played several songs.  They even played “I Just Can’t Wait to be King” in honor of our MEAP King.

After they marched out, the principal spoke about the importance of getting a good night’s sleep and trying your best on each day of testing.  Then, the MEAP King announced the float winners.  Each winning class would enjoy root beer floats (get it?  Float winners – root beer floats?  We’re too funny!) the next week during class.

The great thing about this activity, besides giving the kids a bit of fun during school, is that they were talking at home about the MEAP.  If you ask middle school students to go home and tell their parents that they have a big test coming up and they need to get to bed early, don’t miss school, etc, it won’t happen.  However, as they went home and asked parents to bring a wagon to school, or proudly talked about their class’s ideas for the float, the message got out that we have a big test coming up and students need to be in school.

What does your school do to prepare for those standardized tests?  I’m always happy to steal other’s ideas!

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