United States Social Studies Ideas

www.mrsfenger.wordpress.comFor the first time in a lot of years, I’m teaching social studies.  It’s actually been kind of fun.  After 2 years of teaching a highly scripted curriculum, the idea that I can plan my own lessons is quite liberating!

We’ve been working on the United States, with a lot of success.  Our book divides it into 4 regions, so we’ve worked on a region at a time.  Before we began, I gave the students a map of the United States and asked them to write down all the states and capitals they could.  Obviously, they weren’t able to do many.

Then, we started with the Northeast United States.  The formula I’ve found for studying each region is:

Day 1 – we watch a video from Discovery Education about the region. These are great because they have discussion questions embedded in the video.

Day 2 & 3 – we read the section from the book and discuss what we’re reading.  While I would like to think they can understand what they read as they go, trust me, they need a LOT of help!

Day 4 – start a project to use what they have learned.

At the end of the second week, we have a quiz over the states and capitals of that region.

After the first quiz, I started giving them the previous quiz(zes) along with the current one.  Research shows the best way to learn information to be tested over it.  So, while they don’t get a grade on the old quiz, it’s a good way for them to pull that information back out of their brains.  Most of them take it very seriously and do their best on the review quizzes, even though it’s not for a grade.

www.mrsfenger.wordpress.comI also started the first quiz handback giving students who got 100% a Starburst (because they are stars).  While it won’t necessarily motivate someone who refuses to study, it’s a nice little reward to those who do.  They LOVE it (I know, what they won’t do for a little piece of candy!)

In my next post, I’ll share the projects we’ve been doing.  It’s been fun to see the creative ways their minds think!

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Great site with Reading Street Games

The other day, I was traveling around the internet and I discovered a wonderful website:

http://www.scottsboro.org/~flewis/SF%20Reading%20Street/Sixth%20Grade/Sixth%20Grade%20Reading%20Street%20Online%20Games.htm

 

This site has online games for each week of Reading Street.  Interestingly, some of the reading selections are different from my textbook (which I’ve noticed in other websites, as well).  This leads me to believe there may be different versions of Reading Street out there.

Regardless, this has some great resources for people who use Reading Street!

We are Team Awesome

My team has been working hard this year to brand ourselves as Team Awesome.  Each homeroom that makes up our team is named: Incredibles, Fantastics and Terrifics.   We have posters all over the classrooms and hallways.

Today, we took a giant step forward in our quest for Awesomeness.  We got a donation of t-shirts from the MSU credit union that say “awesome” on the front.  The kids were THRILLED.  We used the opportunity to point out how much support and caring there is for them, since the credit union was willing to donate and we were willing to go through the process of getting them donated.

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Team Awesome shirts

We also talked to them about how jealous everyone is now, since they got shirts.  We also told them they need to remember they are representing Team Awesome wherever they go and so they should make sure they are being good role models.  As we headed outside for a team picture, we said “Stand a little taller, hold your head a little higher, you’re Team Awesome”.  They took that to heart.

At the after school program, other kids and teachers saw them in their shirts and asked about them.  The students proudly informed everyone they are Team Awesome.

During our end of the day team meeting, we issued a challenge to make up a cheer that we can use as a team.  They were feverishly thinking of cheers to submit.  We also challenged them to win the food drive our school is holding.  If Team Awesome brings in 300 items, each member of the team will receive a free A pass.  They left for the day chattering about what they would do to meet the challenges.

 

As we go forward, I plan to remind them “Represent” to keep the Team Awesome spirit alive all year.

 

How do you brand your classroom?

Four Strategies to Get Students to Participate

Getting Students to ParticipateI think every teacher, at some time, has had trouble getting a class to talk, raise their hands, pretend to listen…

When that happens, I often feel like the teachers you see on the movies – standing there, asking a question, waiting, answering it myself, asking a simpler question, waiting, answering it myself………

How many of you have felt that way?  Come on, raise your hand – you know that’s happened!

My class this year is like that.  I have about 3 students who always have their hand raised, begging to be called on.  Then there are the other 28 who sit back, either completely zoned out or hoping I won’t notice them.

Here are some strategies that I have found to be successful *disclaimer – not all strategies work all the time and some strategies don’t work with certain students and using these strategies will not make you rich…

Getting Students to Participate

Getting Students to Participate

First, if it’s a piece of information they’re going to need, like what is a setting, or what is the predicate of a sentence, I have them repeat the definition with me as a class several times.  Then, I ask what it is, and remind them they should all have their hands up.  Then, I call on someone, get the correct answer (I usually stack the deck and call on someone I can be sure will have the right answer), give praise for getting it right, ask it again, call on someone, get the right answer, praise them, ask it again…you get the idea.  Then, throughout the year, I bring that back up and ask the question.  The kids like this method because it lets them feel like they know an answer and because I try to make it fun and silly.  Sometimes I’ll act surprised that they know it (that usually gets a laugh, since they have been drilled on it so many times).

Second, I’ll give them about 30 seconds to check their answer with their group.  I find this is effective because if they don’t know the answer, they hear it from a group member, and if they do know it, they can check to make sure they’re right before saying it in front of the class.

Third, I use sticks to randomly call on students, AFTER having them check their answer with their group.  Then, I don’t let them say I don’t know.  Occasionally I’ll give them a hint, or let them off the hook after some uncomfortable silence.  In those cases, I ask the group if they helped out that student.  If so, it’s a good lesson for them to listen when the group is talking.  *Note – I warn them before talking to their group that they will be called on randomly and I won’t take I don’t know.  Otherwise, it feels like a “gotcha” situation.

Fourth, I have a poster on my wall with things to say other than “I don’t know”.

  •  Can I please have more information?
  •  Can you please repeat the question?
  •  Can I please have more time?

By reminding them that they have other options, they are more likely to try to answer.  Occasionally they’ll use one of those questions and I always praise them for doing that.  We’ve all zoned out during a presentation before, so I try to be understanding about that (but they’re not allowed to zone out every time!)

  1. Finally, I have been known to threaten that if they don’t talk to their groups and participate with the discussion (and pretend to listen to me) they’ll have to write their answers instead.  I know we’re not supposed to use writing as a punishment, but I say “I need to know you’re understanding this and if you won’t talk to your group or me about it, I have to ask you to write your answers down.”  That usually motivates them to be part of the discussion.

One bonus strategy: (and this one takes a while to set up) I also spend a lot of the year building up their confidence and telling them how smart they are.  Often, I find these kids are convinced they don’t know the right answer.  By demonstrating, out loud, that I believe in them and believe they can do this, I find later in the year they’re more likely to try to answer questions.  I also point out times when I don’t know something or when I got it wrong.  I tend to laugh at myself a lot, making them feel like they can be wrong, too.


Pick me!

Pick me!